Helston, Cornwall, England

Godolphin House

Godolphin House

Godolphin House (pictured above) is rightly regarded as a “beautiful and romantic historic house and garden”, where time has stood still, giving the house, garden and surrounding estate buildings a haunting air of antiquity and peace. A visit will also offer archaeologically rich estate walks, and a garden largely unchanged since the 16th century. Godolphin House is under the care of the National Trust.

 

The King’s Room and The Kings Garden were designed to let King Charles II to escape according to Coxe (see below). However, it is a White Lady that emerges from a closet in the house.

 

The White Lady then walks the path from Godolphin House to the Chapel. It is said to be Margaret, wife of the first Earl of Godolphin (Born 2nd August 1652, Died 9th September 1678). She died in childbirth. Her ghostly funeral procession has also been reported at this location, and the route has therefore earned the name of “The Ghost Path”.

Godolphin Cross,

Helston,

Cornwall,

TR13 9RE.

 

For further information, please visit:

www.nationaltrust.org.uk

 

For further information, please read Haunted Britain by Antony D. Hippisley Coxe and Britain's Haunted Heritage by JA Brooks.

Jews Lane

Jews Lane is located near to Godolphin House and is said to be haunted by the spectre of a Jewish man that hung himself from one of the trees there. As was custom with suicides from the time of the incident, he was buried beneath the road. The resulting apparition is said to be a shape-shifter taking the forms of a bull and a fiery chariot. This can be attributed to a mix of local superstition and the amalgamation of legends and local folklore rather than a legitimate ghost sighting.

 

For further information, please read Haunted Britain by Antony D. Hippisley Coxe.

The Penrose Estate

The Penrose Estate is under the care of the National Trust.

 

Over 300 years ago, the wife of Ralph Penrose died. He took his 7 year old son and his cousin William, out to sea following the death of his wife, leaving the estate in the charge of Williams brother, John. Whilst at sea, they ran into a storm and they were wrecked on Cowloe Rock, during which John watched and made no attempt to rescue them. The little boy scrambled ashore but was murdered on John’s orders. William survived, but lost his memory.

 

Years later, William coincidently found himself back at Penrose and heard a boy’s voice say “My uncle bade the captain murder me. I lie beneath the dead tree in the orchard. Dig and bury me”. William did as he was instructed and found the murderer, who then confessed to his evil crime. John hanged himself. However, it was said that Penrose was so badly haunted that William could not live there.

Penrose,

Helston,

Cornwall,

TR13 0RD.

 

For further information, please visit:

www.nationaltrust.org.uk

 

For further information, please read Haunted Britain by Antony D. Hippisley Coxe.

The Floral Dance

The Floral Dance (sometimes referred to as the Furry Dance) takes place here on 8th May. It is one of the oldest British customs still practiced today. The dance is well attended every year and people travel from all over the world to see it. The Helston Town Band plays the music for the dance.

 

For further information, please read Haunted Britain by Antony D. Hippisley Coxe.

Location

Visitor Information

Helston (Cornish: Hellys) is a town and civil parish in Cornwall, England.

It is situated at the northern end of the Lizard Peninsula approximately 12 miles east of Penzance and 9 miles southwest of Falmouth. Helston is the most southerly town on the island of Great Britain and is around 1.5 miles farther south than Penzance.

Pictured left is a view of Godolphin House courtesy of Waterborough. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.